Score Of the Week! (#20)

I managed to swing by my nearby AmVets this week; it wasn’t the most exciting shopping trip ever, as I only came out with one small grocery bag of stuff.  But, nearly *everything* I purchased was something I collect.  That’s good right?  (It should be, I tell myself that if it isn’t– I shouldn’t be collecting it!)  It’s always fun to add to a collection!

Since this week’s score is pretty light and most everything was in some sort of less-desirable condition (dirty, or worse), I’m going to talk about what I got, and then how I cleaned it up.  So yayyyyy– today’s post comes with *bonus tips.*  Or actually “tip.”  We should just call this thrift score edition, “Saved By Blue Dawn And the Magic Eraser.”  ‘Cause it’s pretty much true….

The Clean Texas Glass

The Clean Texas Glass

The Glass Before

The Glass Before

First up is the vintage Hazel Atlas souvenir glass; this was exciting to me because it’s Texas (a state that I’ve visited but didn’t have represented in my glassware collection), as well as the fact that it’s the most fetching chartreuse.  I could obsessively collect fifties chartreuse things, not joking, I respond to that color so much.  Just gorgeous.

I was a little worried though, as in it’s on-the-shelf state at the thrift shop was pretty bad.  It’s a frosted glass– as if you can’t tell– and sometimes that finish can be a little overly-aggressive about hanging on to the color of (particularly red) thrift shop grease pencils, so I knew that the 148 U might give me a problem on its own….  Even scarier was the use of permanent marker, which was actually darker and a little thicker-lined on the other side of the glass….  I knew that it could be an absolute waste of time and money, but I could not resist those things the glass had in the *plus column* for a mere buck fitty.  Glad I didn’t!

I started the cleanup by soaking the glass for about a half an hour in hot, soapy water, with the bad areas submerged.  I scrubbed the inside with a bottle brush– it had obviously sat on a shelf for a while, it had crud coating the inside bottom as well, until it was clean enough that I wouldn’t be skeeved out pouring my drinkles into it.  Then attacking the outside,  I proceeded with my blue Dawn dish soap, dabbing it straight onto the red grease pencil.  A lot of the reasoning behind the blue dawn is that it is a great grease-lifer, and well, they don’t call it “grease pencil” for no reason, you dig?  I then spritzed my magic eraser with my “Mrs Clean” (it’s essentially vinegar, blue dawn, orange essential oil, and water) until it was soaked, and I gently scrubbed away.  You sort of want to be cautious with a magic eraser and vintage glassware, it can and will erode your paint if you use it too aggressively.  Scrub judiciously.  But a regular sponge wasn’t taking off any of this exterior gunk on my glass, so I didn’t feel like I would be worse off it took a bit of color.  Best that I can tell, the glass suffered no damage from the scrub, and the original condition has been completely restored.  I couldn’t be happier with the results.

Vintage Milk Glass Mug

Vintage Milk Glass Mug

Also carefully scrubbed with the magic eraser and blue dawn combo was this vintage milk glass Glassbake mug with the olive green tulip and gingham design on it.  It had some hand worn areas (mainly around the handle) that had  taken on a bit of coffee stain, as well as that joyous grease pencil pricing on a printed area.  Again, it was a buck, and I decided that was worth the risk.  Again, it was.  (And like I said, if you try the magic eraser on stuff like this, know that it works like a *charm* on the milk glass areas, but that it will lift your print a bit on an already worn glass like this.  You decide what is better for you– red grease pencil stains or a little worn paint?)  I’ve already been using this one for my morning coffee now that it’s cleaned up beautifully, I’m so glad I got it.

Vintage Plastic Wall Hangings

Vintage Plastic Wall Hangings

Ah, so these things here.  I have to kinda explain this one…  I have been picking up Burwood, Homco and Styroco  molded plastic wall decs from the 70s and 80s for a while now, at first with no real idea why.  These four are from Burwood, all eighties in era.  Eventually I developed ’emerging themes’ in what I was picking up among the plastic, and I have only really picked up things that ‘fit.’  Birds, baskets (or basketweave), butterflies,  flowers…  I have decided to use them in the tiny windowless bathroom in our downstairs, adorning the walls.  It kinda goes under the theory that everything looks more impressive when grouped with like items–  Are you a believer in this?  I really am.

Well, I’ve been picking these up for a little more than a year now, and it’s struck me that until every last smidgen of that bathroom is covered, I’m going to be hard-pressed to consider that room ‘done’ enough to photograph it and show it to you guys.  Which is kind of funny really– obsessive collector’s brain for you, right there.  I decided rather arbitrarily at New Year’s that I only needed five more pieces to call it done *enough,* and on this trip to AmVets– I got four.  Three hats and the ballet dancer.  So it sounds like you’ll be seeing the bathroom very, very soon.

The Greases In the Creases

The Greases In the Creases

Even Funnier is the fact that I don’t really consider this to be a ‘valuable’ collectible….  I mean, I like them, don’t get me wrong, and they *are* vintage, and some of the designs are pretty dern cool.  But I don’t really feel like there are many of us out there that are obsessively collecting them, and given that they were widely produced and are super-duper-durable, I don’t think they’re rare by any stretch of the imagination.  This could just be my justification for what I’m going to tell you next, but I think it’s true.  I’m not devaluing antiques, in my mind.  You see– I don’t just hang them up.

I once again use my Mrs Clean formula and Magic Eraser to go in and clean out all of the build up stuff in the little cracks, these things can get kinda grotty, especially if you’re getting ones that were in kitchens or bathrooms.   Something about steam and airborne grease can really add to the mix, ew.  So, yeah, I get them good and clean, and then good and dry, and I take them out back and I give them a couple of solid coats of spray paint in my designated bathroom colors.   Something about this simple coat of color makes them so sculptural and interesting…  not only do they feel updated and freshened, they are so much more easily grouped together, because your eye sees them as one big arty thing as a whole, and not– a bird, a butterfly, a bouquet, a basket, another butterfly… etc., etc., and so on.  (I promise this will make more sense when I finally show you the bathroom.)  Anyway, in the interest of full disclosure, here’s what the looked like when I finished them:

Ready-To-Hang Plastic Wall Dealies

Ready-To-Hang Plastic Wall Dealies

Vintage Holiday Pins

Vintage Holiday Pins

Also spiffed up greatly by the touch of the blue Dawn and Magic Eraser were two of these three vintage plastic holiday pins.  This is another one of those random things I collect….  I always look for them, I never pay more than two bucks.  Right now I probably have about fifty of them, spread amongst all of the holidays.  The main brands that manufactured these are Russ and Hallmark, and oddly, these are neither.  The cherub is Avon, the Bunny is American Greetings, and the little stove (I will put with my Thanksgiving) is homemade and so, so random.  I kinda heart it, though.   The other two had really big scuffs on their white and pink parts, again making them sort of icky and worn-looking.  A gentle scrubbing with my cleaning mix and the magic eraser completely buffed all of that off.  (Did I tell you this post was magic eraser heavy or noooot?!)

So, the only other thing that I got, which I DIDN’T clean with that blinkin’ eraser (nor do I ‘collect’ throw pillows) was this purple stripey bolster.  I really like it!  I threw it into a large load with a few other light fabric things and cleaned it with a good wash of purex and white vinegar.  Then I let it air dry.  It has found its home on my bed, and it looks like the paint color was selected to match it, as opposed to being some random pillow I got for $2.50 this week.  Yay, I love it when that happens!  (It’s the ruffly white and purple one on the bottom of the stack.)

Bedroom Throw Pillows

Bedroom Throw Pillows

 


 


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